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AN AIR OF RENEWAL: GREETING SPRING WITH LE SILLAGE BLANC

Updated: Apr 30


Le Sillage Blanc 50ml bottle on a neutral shelf

Welcome to the Parfums Dusita Blog!


We imagined this as a place where we can share insightful content about our fragrances and perfumery in general, with the valuable contributions of our founder and perfumer, Pissara Umavijani.


In this space, you will have the chance to read about Pissara’s creative process, the technical—or other—challenges of composing each fragrance, her favorite raw materials, as well as find exclusive interviews and Q&A sessions (that will include some of your own questions). We will also be adding some fun surprises as we go along!

Le Sillage Blanc illustration




In our first post, we focus on a 2017 creation which, we feel, is perfect for this period of transition to sunnier, warmer days. Parfums Dusita Le Sillage Blanc feels like a ray of light and a breeze of renewal—an ideal scent to signify new beginnings.





The fragrance was born out of Pissara’s love for the iconic, vintage green/leather chypres which she used to collect and wear, and especially the 1944-released Bandit, composed by Germaine Cellier for Robert Piguet. Le Sillage Blanc is inspired by the daring style and spirit of this pioneering perfumer, whose entire œuvre Pissara deeply admires.

Apart from Bandit, Cellier created two more leather chypre marvels, Balmain’s Jolie Madame and Miss Balmain, as well as other masterpieces like Robert Piguet’s Fracas, Balmain’s Vent Vert and Balenciaga’s La Fuite des Heures.

Even though most of the classic leather chypres were marketed as “women’s” fragrances, modern wearers find them astonishingly unisex. Strikingly bold creations (particularly Bandit), they continued the tradition of some great fragrances from the late 1910s-1920s that were created to hail the new, emancipated woman (think of vintage Caron’s Tabac Blond, Molinard’s Habanita or Chanel’s Cuir de Russie).


Le Sillage Blanc 50ml bottle next to its artwork

Pissara envisioned Le Sillage Blanc as an elegant and dynamic green/leather chypre of decidedly gender-fluid character. Her main creative challenge was to allude to some classic examples of this (rather neglected nowadays) perfume genre, while retaining her own artistic signature.



She started out by composing a leather accord built upon isobutyl quinoline, a characteristic component of many vintage leather notes, known for its intensity and animalic undertones. She paired the leather with the genre’s other indispensable pillar, galbanum, whose leafy, balsamic and slightly bitter smell provides the desired richly green bite.


Le Sillage Blanc and its ingredients

Wanting Le Sillage Blanc to evoke its name (French for “The White Trail”) and the image of the first sun rays of the day kissing the dewy grass, Pissara used some natural raw materials of supreme luminosity: the green leather is mellowed by a blast of radiant, invigorating citrusness and floralcy owed to the combination of nectarous neroli, fruity ylang-ylang and a bit of sun-kissed jasmine. A dose of sweet tobacco leaf leads to a full-fledged chypre base of oakmoss and patchouli that wisely balances between dry and moist, while the ethereal ambrette seed becomes the olfactive light that penetrates the chiaroscuro of the earthy elements.


Overall, Le Sillage Blanc delivers a charming interplay between light and shadow, creating an emotional impact of both optimism and mystery—the mark of a true chypre. Assertive, sophisticated and yet profoundly natural in feeling, it is no wonder that Le Sillage Blanc has found so many devoted fans among perfume connoisseurs.


Despina Veneti, Parfums Dusita Blog Editor


Editor’s note: Our wish is that the Parfums Dusita Blog adds value to your experience of our fragrance universe. Don’t hesitate to share with us suggestions about topics you want us to cover (feel free to email us at contact@parfumsdusita.com, with the subject “Parfums Dusita Blog”).

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6 Comments


This was a great read, you can tell that. le sillage blanc was created out of love for classic chypres.

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Thank you so much for reading and for taking the time to leave us a comment! Best, Despina x

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This blog is an excellent idea and such a charming way to celebrate Spring 2024 ! I am very happy to read Despina's first publication about le Sillage Blanc, probably my favorite one with La Mélodie de l'Amour. Your comment about its parentage with Germaine Cellier's masterpieces such as Bandit underlines how Pissara's work and inspiration pays a tribute to the brilliant heritage of perfumery. Bernard Chant's work, especially Cabochard, is another source of inspiration . Anyway, le Sillage Blanc is a true masterpiece in its own and I am very happy and grateful to Pissara for choosing a true chypre and leather accord to launch Dusita's marvellous adventure.

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Dear Françoise, thank you for your kind words and wonderful comment. Grès Cabochard is indeed one of the most iconic green-floral-leather chypres and I fully understand why Le Sillage Blanc brings it to your mind. Monsieur Chant excelled at creating chypres, great fragrances like Aramis, Halston Classic, Imprévu for Coty, Aromatics Elixir for Clinique and Azurée for Estée Lauder.

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This blog is really a brilliant idea. The text is an extreme accurate and evocative description of Le sillage Blanche. If memory serves, this is among the first Pissara's creations after the three extraits and when I received as a sample to try it was love, love at first sniff. I was taken aback to Bandit, but in Le sillage Blanche there is that ray of light and lightness beyong the thick leather accord. This perfume is not just a new revisiting of the famous Piguet's masterpiece, but it is a fantastic rendition on how the concept of gender fluidity changes over time: what was once the conscious violation of a social behavioural code - a woman in a leather…

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Dear Alex, welcome to our blog and thank you for your comment and kind words! I couldn't agree more about the evolving notions of gender (and genre, if I may add) fluidity over the decades. Kind regards, Despina Veneti

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